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Sociology & Social Policy

Higher Education CAO
TR759

If you want to understand the social changes taking place in the world today, and you are curious about people and society, then Sociology is for you.

Social Policy entails the study of those social relations shaping human welfare and wellbeing and analysis of the means by which governments achieve citizen’s well-being through the formation of policies, provision of services and responding to social issues and problems.

Award Name Degree - Honours Bachelor (Level 8 NFQ)
NFQ Classification Major
Awarding Body University of Dublin
NFQ Level Level 8 NFQ
Award Name NFQ Classification Awarding Body NFQ Level
Degree - Honours Bachelor (Level 8 NFQ) Major University of Dublin Level 8 NFQ
Course Provider:
Location:
Dublin City Centre
Attendance Options:
Daytime, Full time
Qualification Letters:
BA (Hons)
Apply to:
CAO

Duration

4 years full-time

Specific Subjects or course requirements

Minimum Entry Requirements: Irish Leaving Certificate

To be considered for admission to a degree course at the University you must:

Present six subjects, three of which must be at grade 5 or above on higher Leaving Certificate papers or at least grade 5 in the University matriculation examination.

The six subjects above must include:

A pass in English.

A pass in mathematics (or foundation-level mathematics (see note 2)) and a pass in a language other than English
OR
A pass in Latin and a pass in a subject other than a language.

Specific Subjects Required

Sociology
None

Social Policy
None

Leaving Certificate General Entry Requirements

Admission Requirements 2024

To qualify for admission to an honours degree course at the University you must:

1 meet the minimum entry requirements (see above).

2 satisfy course specific requirements (where applicable), see above.

3 where there is competition for places, have good enough examination results to be included among those to whom offers are made (see the Leaving Certificate scoring system or Advanced GCE (A Level) scoring system).

Minimum entry points for recent years are available at: www.tcd.ie/study/apply/admission-requirements

Also see ‘Other Requirements’ below.

Notes:
1 A pass means grade O6/H7 or above in the Leaving Certificate and grade 7 or above in the University matriculation examination.

2 Mathematics at foundation-level is acceptable for minimum entry requirements only, for all courses except nursing or midwifery courses.

Irish at foundation-level is not acceptable for minimum entry requirements, course requirements or for scoring purposes.

3 Students may combine grades achieved in different sittings of their Leaving Certificate/Matriculation examinations for the purpose of satisfying minimum entry and/or course requirements, but not for the purposes of scoring. This is not permitted for Medicine.

4 Combinations of Leaving Certificate subjects not permitted:

Physics/chemistry may not be presented with physics or chemistry.

Biology and agricultural science may not be presented as two of the six subjects required for minimum entry requirements, and they may not be presented together to satisfy course specific requirements. However, both may be used for scoring purposes.

Art and music may not be offered as two of the three higher Leaving Certificate grades for minimum entry requirements, but both may be used for scoring purposes.

Bonus Points for Higher Level Mathematics
All students resenting H6 or above in higher level mathematics will have 25 points added to their score for mathematics. The bonus points will only be relevant where mathematics is scored as one of a student’s six best subjects for points purposes.

An applicant’s six best results from one sitting of the Leaving Certificate will be counted for scoring purposes. Applicants may combine results from the Leaving Certificate and the Trinity matriculation examination of the same year for scoring purposes.

The minimum entry levels (points) for Trinity in recent years are available at: www.tcd.ie/study/apply/admission-requirements/undergraduate

University Matriculation Examination
A matriculation examination, graded in equivalent terms to grades used in higher Leaving Certificate examination papers, is held in Trinity every year, usually in April. The subjects of the matriculation examination are Biblical Studies and Geology. You may take one or both of the subjects available, but you should note that the range of university matriculation examination subjects available is not sufficient for the fulfilment of all minimum entry requirements.

The closing date for application for the examination is 1 March of the year of proposed entry to study. Application forms and a syllabus can be obtained from:
Academic Registry, Watts Building, Trinity College Dublin,
the University of Dublin, Dublin 2,
T: +353 1 896 4500,
E: academic.registry@tcd.ie

Other Requirements

English Language Requirement
All applicants must present an English language qualification. Accepted/permitted qualifications are:
1 Irish Leaving Certificate: a grade 6 or better in ordinary level English.

2 GCSE: a grade C/grade 5 or better in English language.

3 US High School: a grade C in English taken in final year.

4 TOEFL
› Paper-based 570 (with a TWE score of 4.5)
› Computer-based 233 (with a score of 4.5 in essay)
› Internet-based 90 (with a written score of 21)

5 Cambridge Advanced/Proficiency: grade C

6 IELTS (academic version) 6.5 (no individual band below 6)
› For Dental courses: IELTS (academic version) 7 (no individual band below 7)
› For Clinical Speech and Language Studies: IELTS (academic version) 7 (no individual band below 7)

7 Pearson Test of English (Academic) – PTE Academic: a minimum score of 63 (with no Communication Skills section score below 59)

8 International Baccalaureate: English A1, A2 or B: 5 at Higher Level (4 at Standard Level if presenting IB through English).

9 QQI/FET: a pass in Communications module (5N0690).

10 Duolingo English Test: Minimum overall score of 120/160, with no section below 105.

Note: Examination results are only valid for two years.

Age Requirement
Applicants seeking admission in 2024 must have a date of birth before 15 January 2008.

Garda Vetting
Students on courses with clinical or other professional placements may be required to undergo Garda vetting procedures prior to commencing placements. If, as a result of the outcome of the Garda vetting procedures, a student is deemed unsuitable to attend clinical or other professional placement, he/she may be required to withdraw from his/her course. Students who have resided outside Ireland for a period of 6 months or more will be required to provide police clearance documentation from the country (including different states) or countries in which they resided.

Students who accept an offer will be informed of the procedures to be followed to complete the vetting process (as part of the student orientation information).

Fitness To Practice
Professional courses demand that certain core competencies are met by students in order to graduate and practice professionally after qualification. Trinity has special responsibility to ensure that all students admitted to all professional programmes will be eligible for registration by the relevant professional body upon graduation. It is important to us that our students are able to fulfil the rigorous demands of professional courses and are fit to practice.

Health Screening
Offers of admission to the following courses are made subject to certain vaccination requirements and/or certain negative test results:
› Clinical Speech and Language Studies
› Orthodontic Therapy, Dental Science, Dental Hygiene, Dental Nursing, and Dental Technology
› Medicine
› Nursing and Midwifery
› Occupational Therapy
› Pharmacy
› Physiotherapy
› Radiation Therapy
› Social Studies (Social work)

Full details are available at: www.tcd.ie/study/apply/admissionrequirements/undergraduate

Leaving Certificate Vocational Progamme LCVP

Leaving Certificate Vocational Programme Link Modules
These modules are accepted for scoring purposes only and are awarded the following points: Distinction 66, Merit 46, Pass 28.

QQI FET Applicants General Information

QQI/FETAC Qualifications
There is an entry route to a number of degree programmes in Trinity for applicants presenting appropriate QQI/FET Level 5 or 6 Major Awards. Applicants presenting distinctions in five modules can be considered for admission.

Full information on courses with QQI entry routes, requirements etc., can be found at the link below.

QQI FET General Information Link

QQI FET Entry Requirements

Careers / Further progression

Sociology
Graduate skills and career opportunities
Sociology graduates find that their broad training and appreciation of how society and people work means they can thrive in careers in the media, journalism, consulting, academia and teaching, policy analysis, non-governmental organisations, management, and advisory roles in the public service. Graduates are working for organisations as diverse as Goodbody Stockbrokers, the ESRI, the European Parliament, Citibank, RTÉ, Google, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Enterprise Ireland.

Social Policy
Graduate skills and career opportunities
The range of employment opportunities in the area of social and public policy continues to expand. This is a particularly relevant degree for those interested in pursuing a career in the formulation of policy in the public sector, community development and voluntary/ non-profit sectors. Graduates of Social Policy at Trinity have secured employment as social researchers, policy analysts government advisors and journalists recruited by companies such as Eurodesk (Brussels Link), the Web Summit, Inner City Organisation Network, Focus Ireland, Migrant Rights Centre, the public service, and various education facilities, to name but a few. The course also provides a solid foundation for specialist postgraduate courses in the areas of social research, social policy and social work.

Points for Joint Honors

Course Web Page

Further information

Mature Students
All undergraduate courses in Trinity are open to mature applicants. Mature student applicants are not required to satisfy the normal minimum entry requirements and are not required to meet competitive academic entry levels (such as Leaving Certificate points), but are considered in the first instance on the basis of how relevant their life, work and educational experiences are to the course(s) that they wish to pursue. In addition, all applicants should demonstrate an interest in and knowledge of their course choice(s).

In order to apply to Trinity as a mature applicant you must:
› be an EU applicant (see page 218)
› be at least 23 years of age on 1 January 2024
› submit a CAO application form to the Central Applications Office (CAO) by 1 February 2024

Late applications will not be considered from mature students.

CAO applications may be made online at: www.cao.ie

Further information about applying through the CAO as a mature student can be found www.cao.ie/index.php?page=mature

Applicants to all courses may be required to attend an interview. Interviews are usually held between April and May.

Certain courses may also require applicants to meet other assessment criteria. For information on additional assessments for specific courses please refer to the Mature Student Guidelines booklet available from:

Academic Registry, Watts Building, Trinity College Dublin, the University of Dublin, Dublin 2, T: +353 1 896 4500, E: academic.registry@tcd.ie

The Mature Student Guidelines booklet is also available to download at: www.tcd.ie/maturestudents/apply

Trinity will inform mature applicants of the outcome of their application before the end of May to allow successful applicants the maximum time possible to prepare for the start of the academic year 2024. Official offers to successful applicants are made through the CAO in early July. To secure your place you must return a formal acceptance notice to the CAO by the specified reply date.

An information seminar to prepare all successful mature applicants for starting in Trinity will take place in July 2024. An orientation programme for all successful mature applicants will take place in August 2024.

For further information on studying in Trinity as a mature student please contact the mature student officer, T: +353 1 896 1386, E: mature.student.officer@tcd.ie For more information, visit: www.tcd.ie/maturestudents

Please Refer to: http://www.tcd.ie/study/eu/undergraduate/

Entry 2024

Early online application (discounted): Fee €30 Closing Date: 20 January 2024 at 5pm

Normal online application: Fee €45 Closing Date: 1 February 2024 at 5pm

Late online application - restrictions apply (see page 3 2024 CAO Handbook): Fee: €60 Closing Date: 1 May 2024 at 5pm

Change of Mind - restrictions apply (see page 3 2024 CAO Handbook): Fee: Nil Closing Date: 1 July 2024 at 5pm

Exceptional online late application (see page 34 of the 2024 CAO Handbook): Fee €60 Closing Date: 22 July 2024 at 5pm

Be sure to complete any action well in advance of closing dates. You should avoid making an application close to a closing date. No extensions to closing dates will be allowed and all application fees are non-refundable.

LATE APPLICATIONS
Late Applications are those which are received after 5pm on 1 February 2024. The closing date for late applications is 5pm on 1 May 2024, subject to the restrictions listed on page 3 of the 2024 CAO Handbook. The online facility for late applications opens on the 5 March 2024 at 12:00 noon - a fee of €60 applies.

Exceptional Late Applications (Exception to the timetable)
The exceptional closing date of 22 July at 5pm applies only to applicants who are registered as an undergraduate student on 1 May 2024 in any year in any one of the participating HEIs (subject to the exclusions listed below). In order to avail of the Exceptional Late Application facility you must have entered the HEI through the CAO system. This is an exceptional late closing date and all steps must be completed by 5pm on 22 July. No changes may be made after this date.

If you did not enter your current course through the CAO system, you must first contact the Admissions Office of the HEI to which you wish to apply and they will inform you if you may submit an application direct to the institution.

Exclusions:
You may submit a late application only for entry to courses other than your existing course. If you wish to repeat the year in the same course you must arrange this within your HEI.

Mary Immaculate College Limerick, Marino Institute of Education, Trinity College Dublin, University of Limerick and Maynooth University have special procedures in place in the case of current or previous students who wish to apply for entry to another course in the same HEI. Such applicants must contact their Admissions Office to determine the application procedure. However, if you are a student in another HEI and you wish to apply to any of these five HEIs, you should apply through CAO.

Refer to page 34 of the 2024 CAO Handbook on how to make an Exceptional Late Application.

Restrictions
As a CAO applicant you may experience one or more of the following restrictions based on your course choices, your category of application, or restrictions imposed by the HEIs that you wish to apply to. Please read the section on 'Restrictions' on page 3 of the 2024 CAO Handbook carefully. This section includes information on:

General Restrictions
1. Making a late application
2. Making changes to your course choices

Restricted Courses
3. Applying for a restricted course

Mature Applicants
4. Mature applicants

Supplementary Admissions Routes
5. Applying for DARE and/or HEAR

Sociology

What is Sociology?
Sociology studies the interaction of people within social groups like families, schools and companies and how this shapes their behaviours and life chances. It explores questions such as: why do migrants develop their cultural identities in different ways? How is privacy changing with the rise of digital technologies? How does a child’s family of origin shape their chances of educational success and future job? Do state rules and regulations represent and protect elite power? Sociology is foremost among the social sciences in its understanding of social change.

Sociology: The course for you?
If you want to understand the social changes taking place in the world today, and you are curious about people and society, then Sociology is for you. You will also gain the ability to understand topical issues and to present and communicate information and thoughts coherently. In addition, you will learn invaluable analytical, communication, research and presentation skills – transferable skills which can be applied to a wide range of careers and postgraduate programmes.

Sociology at Trinity
There has been a rich tradition of sociological education at Trinity since the 1960s. The department is committed to advancing the understanding of society and to igniting the passion of our students through exceptional teaching and research. The Sociology Department is in the top 150 in the world (QS World University Rankings by Subject, 2020). The Department of Sociology is internationally known for its work on education and employment, migration, identities, social inequalities, conflict and digital lives. The department has won several teaching awards – both for postgraduates and staff – for outstanding contribution in the pursuit of teaching excellence.

As a recent graduate put it, Sociology explains how the great thinkers predicted the ills of modern society from social isolation to empty hospital wards. It questions the future of whether India can and will become the next China, and whether the internet will undermine traditional communities. It explains the underlying reasons why European societies are culturally so different. It tackles the big social issues of conflict, race, migration, gender and popular culture. It teaches you how to understand, research and explain all of these topics in a logical, organised fashion.

Study abroad
Around one third of our undergraduate students participate in Erasmus and non-EU international exchanges. You may participate in full-year or half-year exchanges with the following partner institutions: Sorbonne University (France), University Lille 1 (France), Charles University Prague (Czech Republic), Umea University (Sweden), University of Copenhagen (Denmark), University of Helsinki (Finland), University of Malta (Malta), Istanbul Bogazici University (Turkey), Utrecht University (Netherlands), Ludwig Maximilian University Munich (Germany). In addition, you can compete for a smaller number of places on university-wide non-European exchanges with partners in Australia, Singapore, China, Japan, Hong Kong, Brazil, Canada and the USA in your third year. Most of these universities offer their courses through English

Social Policy

What is Social Policy?
Social Policy entails the study of those social relations shaping human welfare and wellbeing and analysis of the means by which governments achieve citizen’s well-being through the formation of policies, provision of services and responding to social issues and problems. As a course of undergraduate study Social Policy fits with a commitment to advance the cause of a just, pluralistic and sustainable society. The course encourages engagement with wider society and civic engagement through modules on issues such as refugee policy, housing and homelessness, ageing and the lifecourse, youth, reproductive rights, social inequality, disability and domestic violence. A global outlook is a reoccurring and integral part of the course.

Our curriculum aims to give you a thorough training in the systematic analysis of contemporary social issues and the role of social policy in comparative country contexts. At the end of your four years you should have developed both a general understanding of the field of social policy and specific expertise in select contemporary policy issues, the process of policy making and the skills of research, analysis and argumentation applicable to the policy arena.

Social Policy: The course for you?
Curious about social and economic policy issues around the world? Searching for a course that demands both academic and vocational qualities? Interested in understanding society, its social problems and have a desire to make a difference? Then Social Policy may be the subject choice for you. It is particularly relevant to students intending to pursue a career in research, social policy analysis and evaluation, management and planning within the social services, both voluntary and statutory, as well as to those with a general interest in society and social policy.

Social Policy at Trinity
Trinity’s School of Social Work and Social Policy strives for an ethos that values multidisciplinary scholarship; research-led teaching; a diverse student base; a student-centred approach to education and pastoral care; public service; partnership with colleagues in other parts of the University, and with colleagues in other institutions; international experience, connections and integration between teaching, research and policy influence. Social Policy in Trinity ranks in the top 100 universities worldwide (QS World Rankings by Subject 2019), making Social Policy at Trinity the highest ranking university in Ireland.

Pathways
The pathways available are Major with Minor and Joint Honours. There may also be an opportunity to take this subject up as a New Minor Subject from second year.

Study abroad
Students have the opportunity to study abroad in their third year at prestigious universities in Europe through the Erasmus programme as well as through non-EU international exchanges. You may participate in full-year or half-year exchanges with partner institutions in countries such as Sweden, France, Malta, Finland and the Czech. In addition, you can compete for a smaller number of places on university-wide non-European exchanges with partners in Australia, Singapore, China, Japan, Hong Kong, Brazil, Canada and the USA in your third year. Most partner universities offer their courses through English.

Sociology

Your degree and what you’ll study
Our modules cover Ireland, the wider European society, the non-European world and the global arena. The first two years are more general and foundational in nature while the third and fourth years are characterised by smaller, more intimate classes that attempt to challenge you intellectually and encourage problem solving and critical thinking skills.

Sociology teaching in the first and second years emphasises the understanding of the basic principles of sociology and the acquisition of both quantitative and qualitative skills necessary for more in-depth study. In first year, you are introduced to the distinctive questions that sociologists ask about human society, and the theories and concepts used in the search for answers. You have approximately 6 hours of lectures and 3 hours of tutorials per week in Sociology. In the second year, you study issues around gender, work and family; power, state and social movements, and are introduced to sociological research methods and theory.

Third and fourth years
Specialisation in sociological topic areas, and more advanced analysis, research and presentation skills are provided in the third and fourth years. In your third year, you learn about Globalisation and Development; Comparative Sociology of Europe; Race, Ethnicity and Identity; Social Stratification and Inequalities, and carry out research projects involving analysis of both numerical data from surveys, and verbal data that are the outcomes of recorded interviews and focus groups. The fourth year offers modules in a variety of topic areas, including Digital Lives and Social Networks; Labour Markets, Gender and Institutions; Migration, Mobilities and Integration, and Conflict Studies. You have the opportunity to carry out your own independent Capstone research project from start to finish on a topic of your choice (recent projects included: Immigration and the prison system, Unmarried fathers’ participation in their children’s lives, and Counterurbanisation in the Irish countryside). Many students find this a great asset when talking to employers and applying for jobs.

Social Policy

Your degree and what you’ll study
The fundamental aim of the degree programme is to give students a thorough training in the systematic study of social policy, contemporary social issues and how policy works. Teaching methods include lectures, seminars and group project work utilising innovative approaches enhanced by digital technologies. Assessment is by a combination of continuous assessment, written submissions, class presentations, examinations, real-world relevant assignments (such as policy case studies or ministerial briefings) and a final year Capstone project.

First and second years
In first year you will take introductory modules in Social Policy Concepts and Social Policy in Action and skills-based modules on Accessing and Reviewing Scholarly Literature in the field of Social Policy as well as a module in Critical Analysis and Argument Development.

The second year places greater emphasis on social policy issues offering modules including Poverty in Society; European Refugee Policy; Citizen Participation in Research & Policy and Health Policy. You will also be given the opportunity to take modules from other programmes across the university under the Approved Module and Trinity Electives model. This can include other social science modules such as Economy of Ireland; Economics of Public Policy; History of Political Thought; International Relations; Comparative Politics; Introduction to Irish Family Law; French, German, Russian, Polish language, and Trinity Electives. In first and second years students typically have two lectures and one tutorial per week for each module.

Third and fourth years
The choice of modules available in third year typically includes modules such as Global Social Policy, Youth and Society, Aging and Intergenerational Relations, and Policy Issues in Human Services.

Again in third year, student have the option to take modules from other programmes across the university under the Approved Module and Trinity Electives model. Third year students also have the option to study abroad in a European or international university.

The choice of modules available in fourth year typically includes: Eco-Social Policy, Disability and Global Human Rights, Regulating Reproductive Bodies and a research methods module covering statistical analysis, documentary and policy analysis as well as qualitative research skills. In the final year you will research and write a Capstone project on a topic of your choice under supervision from a member of our School.

Sociology

Modules are examined by a combination of continuous assessment including essays, portfolios, individual and group presentations, and the formal end-of-semester examination. In addition, students specialising exclusively in sociology in their final year complete a Capstone project.

www.tcd.ie/swsp/undergraduate
E socpol@tcd.ie

Department of Sociology, School of Social Sciences and Philosophy, Trinity College Dublin, the University of Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland
www.tcd.ie/sociology
E sociology@tcd.ie

Course Provider:
Location:
Dublin City Centre
Attendance Options:
Daytime, Full time
Qualification Letters:
BA (Hons)
Apply to:
CAO